Tag Archive for Rida Bazzi

In Memoriam Alexander Kaczmarczyk

Lebanon Philately reprint Wed Feb 18, 2009

Dear Friends,

It is with great sadness that I learned today of the passing away of
Alexander Kaczmarczyk after a long fight with illness.

Many in this group know him as the author of a book on the stamps of
Syria and Lebanon: “The Postal Issues of Syria, Lebanon and the
Alaouites 1919-1945″. He was also the foremost authority on the stamps
and postal history of the Arab Kingdom of Syria. His passing away is a
great loss to middle eastern philately.

I will always remember him as a great friend and a passionate collector
whose friendship and knowledge enriched the lives of those who knew him.

Rida Bazzi

Question about signed forged stamps

Lebanon Philately reprint Tue Oct 24, 2006

Good Morning,
Sometimes forged stamps like YT36a, 36, 37 are proposed with experts
signatures. How does it happen?
Regards

Hi Math,

Many possible ways :

a) sometimes we find some minor stamps with expert signatures and we
ask ourselves why it was important for the owner of the cheap stamps to get
them signed? The answer is: in some cases (when the owner is a forgerer)
with signed “cheap” stamps like YT121, YT115, or YT62 he can overprint them
and produce expensive forged stamps.

b) We have been informed lately (information to be confirmed) that
some forgerers have made experts sign expensive stamps normally and
innocently ;) . Once they got the signature they fabricate a rubber stamp
producing forged signatures.

c) Some forgerers bought the signing stamps from the descendants of
dead experts.

d) Some ignorant “experts” may sign forged stamps.

In my opinion it is very important not only to have signed stamps but ask
also for a certificate.

In one of the emails our friend Rida sent us an url showing the signatures
of some experts.

Regards from Paris

Elie

 

Cana Cross

Reprint from Lebanon Philately Fri Nov 26, 2004

The cross of the Cana series is printed twice. One of them is
the visible one and the other is invisible, but can be seen
under ultraviolet light. Forging that is hard as applying the
invisible cross requires specialized equipment that costs a
lot of money.

Rida

Quana-Cross Serie

Reprint from Lebanon Philately Mon Sep 27, 2004

There is an important feature for the Cana set that is not shared by other
rare/scarce lebanon material. It is a regular issue of stamps. It is not
a souvenir sheet and it is not an imperf or an error. If it becomes
accepted in all catalogues, anyone who wants completion of a basic
Lebanon collection, would have to get it. This is not the case for souvenir
sheets
and errors. So my point is that it has a larger buyers base.

But as I pointed out there a few hundreds sets at least and there aren’t
that many collectors of Lebanon who are willing to pay a lot.

A set that is similar to Cana is the Grand Zero. In the 1950′s it was sold
for $100 (that is what an old time collector told me). It was really
scarce at that time. While it is still difficult to find (especially MNH),
its price is nowhere near Cana. The grand zero (50p) has a printing
of 50,000 and was heavily used: I have seen copies used from Ain Zhalta,
Beirut, and Karoun. The remaining ones cannot be that numerous.

Rida

Forgeries on Ebay. Buyers beware

Reprint from Lebanon Philately Fri Sep 24, 2004

I do not think it is really hard to define what a forgery is.
During the process of printing some errors are made. This can
include double or inverted overprints in addition to other more minor
errors such as missing letters, broken letters, displaced letters and the like.
Some of these reach the public through the post office (the inverted jenny
is an example of an error that reached the public). So, unintentional errors
occur even if they seem quite dramatic.

During the printing of the Lebanon overprint issues,
some errors were made on purpose by the printing press for the benefit
of collectors. A well known example of such errors from another collecting
is the misperf errors of king farouk. These were made for the king and are
currently collected and are sometimes expensive. So, this type of
errors was prepared using the original lates AND original inks at the
time of issue. Whether someone wants to collect such errors or not
is a personal choice.

A forgery is what has been prepared using modern materials.
For example, if someone has an original handstamp and uses
that to make a cover (the olympics on cover for example) using
modern ink, that is a forgery by any definition of the word.
Whether you want to buy it or not is up to you, but at least
you should always no what you are buying.

If someone makes a new overprint not using the original plates,
then that is a forgery by an definition.

These are the types of forgeries I refer to when I say that there
are forgeries on ebay. You should always be careul what you
buy and you should always ask for an expertzing extension even
if you do not use it. In the past, I asked for an expertizing
extension from Mr. Assad and he was glad to grant me such
an extension. I sent the stamps for expertization and they came
back genuine. You should always ask for that option and if
the seller has nothing to hide they should be glad to grant
it.

Other sellers might not be willing to grant you an extension
and in that case you should wonder their reason for that.
This happened with me in the past.

Below is a message a posted a while ago. It might be
helpful.

Rida

Lebanon overprinted issues.

- According to Yvert 1936 specialized edition, there is
a large number of errors produced in clandestine
printings (supposedely these are prepared using the
original inks and plates at the time of issue). Yvert
1936 states that it only lists errors that have reached
the general public through the post office. Even with this
restriction, there are too many Lebanon errors. I personally
collect all errors that have been produced using original
inks and plates. It should be emphasized that errors
prepared in clandestine printing using original material
cannot be distinguished from other “genuine” errors. The
only source that I know to distinguish them is Yvert 1936
edition. Maury lists errors that are not listed in Yvert
1936. It should be noted here that Yvert 1936 is not exhaustive
and there are errors produced in official printings that
are not listed in Yvert 1936. These have been identified
by later studies done by collectors. Typically, these
are not major double/inverted overprints, but rather minor
errors that have to do with spacing and defects with
individual letters.

- To spot forgeries, you should have reference material.
Forgers typically do not have reference material, the
patience or the knowledge needed to prepare truly good
forgeries. For the GRAND LIBAN and Gd Liban overprints,
forgers do not have in general access to french stamps
without overprints, so forgeries are typically double
overprints rather than inverted overprints (it is easier
to get the overprinted Lebanon stamps, than the orginal
french stamps). This does not mean that forgeries of
inverted overprints were not made (one example is the
Ronsard stamp. One forgery I know has narrow distance between
the arabic 4 and “al-kabir”). Some time ago there was a
number of the french period errors with double and double-one-
inverted overprints that are all forgeries in my opinion.

Assuming you have enough reference material (large blocks
or panes of normal stamps), you can spot forgeries by
comparing the original stamp to the stamp with the error.
Typically, each position has some small defect in the overprint
that can be used to identify it. Also, the base stamp itself
typically has some small variations. The first step is to
identify the plate position of the overprint. Then, you
would want to make sure that the base stamp itself is the
correct plate position. For double overprints the plate
position of the base stamps should be the same as
the same plate position for the overprint. Also, the two
overprints should be the same (have the same defects).
One cannot rule out the possibility that the paper
can shift and that the two overprints do not match, but
this is the exception and very uncommon. For inverted overprints,
the plate position of the base stamp is not the same as that
of the overprint. For stamps that are printed in panes
of 50, the plate position of the base stamp should be 50-x
where x is the plate position of the overprint. In my collection,
I have “expertized” almost all my french period errors using
the method described above. Note that there are other things to
look at like the ink and the impression, but usually, if the
plate positions match, one can be confident. The forger does
not have usually the knowledge or material
to prepare forgeries that take into consideration plate
positions. One should keep in mind that some stamps had
multiple printings in which case one would have to have
reference material for all printings in order to decide
that a particular stamp is a forgery.

Some sellers can be quite obstinate though. In the past,
I have pointed to some sellers on ebay that what they are
selling are forgeries based on comparisons to blocks I have.
For example, I have to panes of 50 of the Ronsard stamps
(of which there was one printing). A seller once told me
that my sheets might be forgeries and his single stamp
genuine. While this is true in principle, in practice,
forging a whole sheet with different defects in every
position is highly unlikely especially for cheap lebanese
stamps (I have seen in the past forgeries of whole
sheets of expensize hong kong stamps).

Hopefully, this is helpful (for some of you, this old news).

Lebanon errors and forgeries

Reprint from Lebanon Philately Tue Jul 20, 2004

Thanks Bassem for taking the initiative and creating this group.

Here is some information that everyone might find useful.

Lebanon overprinted issues.

- According to Yvert 1936 specialized edition, there is
a large number of errors produced in clandestine
printings (supposedly these are prepared using the
original inks and plates at the time of issue). Yvert
1936 states that it only lists errors that have reached
the general public through the post office. Even with this
restriction, there are too many Lebanon errors. I personally
collect all errors that have been produced using original
inks and plates. It should be emphasized that errors
prepared in clandestine printing using original material
cannot be distinguished from other “genuine” errors. The
only source that I know to distinguish them is Yvert 1936
edition. Maury lists errors that are not listed in Yvert
1936. It should be noted here that Yvert 1936 is not exhaustive
and there are errors produced in official printings that
are not listed in Yvert 1936. These have been identified
by later studies done by collectors. Typically, these
are not major double/inverted overprints, but rather minor
errors that have to do with spacing and defects with
individual letters.

- To spot forgeries, you should have reference material.
Forgers typically do not have reference material, the
patience or the knowledge needed to prepare truly good
forgeries. For the GRAND LIBAN and Gd Liban overprints,
forgers do not have in general access to french stamps
without overprints, so forgeries are typically double
overprints rather than inverted overprints (it is easier
to get the overprinted Lebanon stamps, than the orginal
french stamps). This does not mean that forgeries of
inverted overprints were not made (one example is the
Ronsard stamp. One forgery I know has narrow distance between
the arabic 4 and “al-kabir”). Some time ago there was a
number of the french period errors with double and double-one-
inverted overprints that are all forgeries in my opinion.

Assuming you have enough reference material (large blocks
or panes of normal stamps), you can spot forgeries by
comparing the original stamp to the stamp with the error.
Typically, each position has some small defect in the overprint
that can be used to identify it. Also, the base stamp itself
typically has some small variations. The first step is to
identify the plate position of the overprint. Then, you
would want to make sure that the base stamp itself is the
correct plate position. For double overprints the plate
position of the base stamps should be the same as
the same plate position for the overprint. Also, the two
overprints should be the same (have the same defects).
One cannot rule out the possibility that the paper
can shift and that the two overprints do not match, but
this is the exception and very uncommon. For inverted overprints,
the plate position of the base stamp is not the same as that
of the overprint. For stamps that are printed in panes
of 50, the plate position of the base stamp should be 50-x
where x is the plate position of the overprint. In my collection,
I have “expertized” almost all my french period errors using
the method described above. Note that there are other things to
look at like the ink and the impression, but usually, if the
plate positions match, one can be confident. The forger does
not have usually the knowledge or material
to prepare forgeries that take into consideration plate
positions. One should keep in mind that some stamps had
multiple printings in which case one would have to have
reference material for all printings in order to decide
that a particular stamp is a forgery.

Some sellers can be quite obstinate though. In the past,
I have pointed to some sellers on ebay that what they are
selling are forgeries based on comparisons to blocks I have.
For example, I have to panes of 50 of the Ronsard stamps
(of which there was one printing). A seller once told me
that my sheets might be forgeries and his single stamp
genuine. While this is true in principle, in practice,
forging a whole sheet with different defects in every
position is highly unlikely especially for cheap Lebanese
stamps (I have seen in the past forgeries of whole
sheets of expensize hong kong stamps).

Hopefully, this is helpful (for some of you, this old news).

To be continued …..

Rida Bazzi